Lightroom 5

Lightroom 5 was released on June 9th 2013. It is a modest upgrade to Adobe’s main software package for photographers. The limited number of changes may be because it took 1 year to develop (Lightroom 4, by comparison, took 2.5 years). A new version of Lightroom may have been needed to get a clean baseline of tools that coincided with the release of Adobe Creative Cloud.

Software aspects

The new version still contain “encounterable” minor software bugs. Although these seem mainly related to the user interface, less eager adopters may want to wait for a 5.1 upgrade.

A Lightroom 5 bug
The above error appears to have popped up in Lightroom versions as long ago as 2008. But I hadn’t seen worthwhile errors in earlier Lightroom versions, so maybe LR5 was brought to the market somewhat rushed.

Lightroom 5 incidentally requires Windows 7 or 8. Windows Vista (which I still run on my laptop) is no longer supported.

The Lightroom concept

Despite its official name

Adobe® Photoshop® Lightroom® 5.0

Lightroom does not create modified image files from original files like Photoshop does. Instead it stores the adjustments you used to modify the image (e.g. “crop the image”) on disk. This is done in a so-called catalog. It automatically re-applies these adjustments whenever you view, print, edit or export the image. This saves storage space, simplifies file management and is convenient if you afterwards change your mind about any of the settings (e.g. “make the crop larger”).

From Photoshop to Lightroom

In general, Lightroom is meant for photographers who want to post-process their images, while Photoshop is nowadays mainly for graphics professionals who want to create new images. Sometimes a photographer does need Photoshop, but usually Lightroom is easier and faster to use because it is designed for photographers.

In each new Lightroom release the needs for Photoshop decreases a bit. The new licensing model for Photoshop may further accelerate the migration of photographers to Lightroom: you can still buy Lightroom, but you need to pay a yearly fee to use Photoshop (and a bunch of other Adobe tools).

Main new features in Lightroom 5

Radial gradient – This is a way to adjust a circular or elliptic area with soft edges in a number of ways. It is comparable to “dodge and burn” in the darkroom days.

rabbit_gradient

Circular gradient used to add fill light, color temperature and clarity.

Previous Lightroom versions had a few tools that are somewhat comparable:

  • Graduated Filter – for modifying one end of the image. Straight.
  • Adjustment Brush – for modifying an area which you paint in with a brush. Flexible.
  • Post-crop vignetting – light/dark adjustments only. Always in the middle of the crop.

Smart previews – These are essentially about 4 MPixels versions of the images that can be used if the full images are temporarily not available. You can choose which images or directories have smart previews. The software uses available smart previews if the USB drive or (in my case) NAS containing the images is not online. If you have access to smart previews, you can edit the images just like you could edit your original image – although you cannot see the image at full resolution. In my case that would mean editing at max 2540 × 1693 resolution without being able to zoom in to see the full 21 Mpixel resolution of my Canon 5D2. The feature is useful for laptop use, but also has benefits if you need to send somebody a Lightroom catalog to view or even edit.

Smart Preview2

Smart Preview controls are below the histogram.

Smart Preview

Smart previews are internally 2540 pixel raw files in Adobe’s DNG raw format.

Straightening – The “Upright” feature corrects tilted horizons and fixes problems with perspectives in architectural photography. Unlike DxO’s Viewpoint, you don’t have to indicate a set of lines or a rectangle that are supposed to be straightened. The software detects this automatically and gives a few options within the Lens Corrections section. Note that the image is warped to get this result.

Original image

Original image

2013_Vienna_09-2

Automatically straightened

Fully straightened (automatically)

Fully straightened (automatically)

Note that there are parts missing parts in the final image. These would normally be shown in black and cropped off by the user.

You could argue that this feature is the poor man’s Tilt and Shift lens: with a camera on a level tripod a wide-angle lens should get you similar results. The wide-angle should be enough if you keep the camera level, but shifting the lens up can get the horizon below the middle of the photo if required. This was not required for the above photo.

Other new features

PNG file support – I have some PNG files in my archive that I used for creating photo books. “Synchronizing” my storage folders using Lightroom 5 now brings these files into Lightroom. The files are not too relevant as the format is seldom used for photos, but here is an example of a PNG file that I used as an illustration in a photo book:

Continuous_happinessSpot removal – Lightroom 4′s circular spot removal tool has been extended to allow you to paint away any bobs that needs replacements.

In addition, a tool is provided to make sensor dust spots show up better. Here is part of the original image before any corrections. If you look carefully while slowly scrolling the image you may discover several dust spots:

Original image (with spots)

Original image (with spots)

While using the Spot Removal (Q) tool you can enable Visualize Spots mode. This enhances edges and shows them as white pixels. Black pixels represent lack of local detail. The ten or so small circles in the sky are dust spots:

Spots highlighted by Lightroom 5

Spots highlighted by Lightroom 5

The next screenshot shows eleven spots that I had manually discovered (using Lightroom 4) and had fixed earlier. In this case, you can see that I had manually discovered (using my motion trick at 100% magnification and slightly increased contrast) pretty much the same spots that Lightroom 5 could capture. Note that finding spots in a cloudless blue sky would be easier.

Spots repair locations

Spots repair locations

 

3 thoughts on “Lightroom 5

  1. Sakke

    The new features look good. If I understand right, the whole functionality ( except photo library management) is available through Photoshop CS6 (or maybe only the creative cloud version). As an Aperture user, I have had access to LR4 features through PS CS5.

    Reply
    1. pvdhamer Post author

      LR can get PS to import a file with all adjustments made in LR. This involves having the latest version of an import module called Adobe Camera Raw (ACR). This means that a CR2 file that was “edited” in LR can be moved to PS with all the edits. It then displays 100.00% the same. So data exchange from LR to PS works fine if you have suitable version of ACR.

      But there is another part to the question which is relevant for non-LR users: can I make all of LR’s adjustments in PS? Some of the adjustments can be made when you import a new CR2 or NEF file via ACR directly into PS. Example: you probably can set ‘Clarity’ during import but cannot adjust clarity later within PS. LR adjustments that involve more than dragging ACR sliders are not available in PS – although there is usually a more complex PS equivalent. Example is the radial gradient: it can be done in PS, but requires using PS layers/masks. Thus it’s more complex to do (requires a degree at PS University and a methodological view on life). but the PS equivalent can do more – and is only limited by your own skills. So LR can be seen as a user friendly interface to PS which is essentially a powerful but only semi-friendly toolkit with image processing algorithms.

      Hope this helps;-)

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>